1506, 2018

Links for a day 205: World Cup. Dead Cross, book and mash-up

June 15th, 2018|Tags: , , |5 Comments

World Cup of Faith No More

In the greatest crossover event of all time, the Faith No More World Cup has kicked off on Twitter. Thirty-two Faith No More songs divided into 8 groups of 4. Twitter users vote for the favourite and the two with the most votes in each group advance to the round of 16. Then it is one song against another all the way until the final.
See all the polls here and vote

 

Book interviews

Interest is picking up on my Faith No More book, Small Victories—published by Jawbone Press in September—and two sites have published interviews with me this week.
Here is my chat with Hungarian site Fülesbagoly 

And my interview—including a small excerpt that did not make the final edit—with Czech cultural site Protisedi

Dead Cross on tour

Mike Patton and Dead Cross are earning rave reviews for their high-octane European tour shows. I get the chance to see Dead Cross in Lausanne next week but here are some links showing their recent shows:
Great close-up of video of Dead Cross’s last-minute show in Camden

Friend of the site Nessie captured some great shots here on our Freaks and Geeks page

Jim and Faith No More Followers were at Dead Cross at Download last weekend, and here is their comprehensive review of the two shows.

Is When Good Dogs Do Bad Things the best Patton vocal?

Revolver magazine ran a fan poll to find the best Mike Patton vocal performance, and the Dillinger Escape Plan track was the winner.

Faith No More v Muse v Oasis

I stumbled across another of those Epic-featuring mash-ups recently, and actually the Oasis meets Epic part is somehow alluring.

More book stuff

Here is my guide on where to buy the book if you’re not keen on Amazon.

2704, 2018

ON THIS DAY: Faith No More play Hammersmith 1990 full audio

April 27th, 2018|Tags: , , |16 Comments

Faith No More played the Hammersmith Odeon on the 27 April 1990, on the first of two career-defining nights in London. It was the band’s fourth UK tour in the space on 10 months, and they were at the peak of their popularity and power. They would play Brixton Academy, where You Fat Bastards was filmed, the following night, playing to almost 9,000 people in London over two nights.

Here is audio of the Hammersmith show:

And, of course, you can read all about this historic tour in the Faith No More biography Small Victories, available for pre-order now.
geni.us/YdG3

 

(C) Faith No More Followers

1304, 2018

LINKS FOR A DAY 204: Book round-up and more

April 13th, 2018|Tags: , , , |4 Comments

Amazingly, this is the first Links for a Day post in over a year.

In mitigation, I’ve been busy-—with the book.

There’s been some good coverage in the past few weeks.

Here’s the most recent interview with the Faith No More blog, which goes into some detail on writing the book and what’s covered:

For fans, this will be a book that tells the full story of Faith No More – with new stories, new details, and new insight from band members and key figures. If you want to know how and why the band started; how the various members joined and left; how the band were signed and signed again; how and why they had such success with The Real Thing; how the albums were made; what happened on tours; who nearly joined the band; how and why the band split; how and why the band got back together; and what the band thought and think of it all – and much, much more – then this is the book for you.

And here’s a story from Patton Fanatic.

Remember, you can buy the book from your Amazon store/shop here.

A video of Faith No More playing their scintillating set at the industry showcase at the Foundations Forum metal expo in Los Angeles 1989 has surfaced this week on YouTube via Malochio. The story behind the show features in Small Victories, but suffice to say Metallica and Axl Rose all feature.

2802, 2018

New Bill Gould interview in Kerrang!

February 28th, 2018|Tags: , |4 Comments

The latest issue of Kerrang! features an in-depth interview with Bill Gould on Faith No More’s history and a little bit about the band’s future.

He says:

‘We talk all the time. Are we still a band? I can’t tell you. Last time around, we didn’t even tell our wives that we were making music again, so I’m fucked if I’m going to tell you!’

Bill also gives some nice details on the band’s past – something that of course will be covered in Small Victories, the Faith No More biography which will be published in September.

 

1111, 2017

Chuck Mosley RIP

November 11th, 2017|Tags: |10 Comments

The tragic death of Chuck Mosley has left all Faith No More fans devastated, numb and bereft. Chuck was the voice of Faith No More for most of the 1980s, and in many ways the personification of the the raw, untamed and brash band spirit.

Embed from Getty Images

I did not know Chuck. Unlike many fans, I did not get the chance to meet him in person. But I spoke to him by phone and email. And in recent research I got to appreciate profoundly his role in the band’s creation and evolution and early success. I attempted to capture this contribution and legacy and this spirit and essence over many pages and many months. But today, despite darkness and despair, the band, his band, succeeded in capturing that essence in pitch perfect fashion in a few hours, in a few lines:

It’s with a heavy, heavy heart we acknowledge the passing of our friend and bandmate, Chuck Mosley. He was a reckless and caterwauling force of energy who delivered with conviction and helped set us on a track of uniqueness and originality that would not have developed the way it had had he not been a part. How fortunate we are to have been able to perform with him last year in a reunion style when we re-released our very first record. His enthusiasm, his sense of humor, his style and his bravado will be missed by so many. We were a family, an odd and dysfunctional family, and we’ll be forever grateful for the time we shared with Chuck.

Chuck – charismatic, boisterous, quick-witted – was a natural front man. He joined Faith No More in 1983. The band wanted a presence for live shows rather than a voice for recordings. And Chuck delivered: he was part poet, part punk preacher, part precarious performer, all attitude.

His devil-may-care demeanour was a little deceptive. He said of his introduction to Faith No More: ‘I was really nervous. And I remember being in awe of this sound because I hadn’t heard anything like it before. It made me nervous because I didn’t know what to do with it. You know what I mean? That was where the rapping came from.’ That’s the origin of rap-rock. Punk attitude, unfamiliar music, improvisation — allied to having little chance to rehearse with the rest of the band based down the coast in San Francisco — led to chanting and ranting and, eventually, when things calmed down somewhat in the studio, to rapping: ‘I was just like screaming to the beat, like ranting. Not rapping, but ranting.’

Chuck was also an accomplished lyricist, capable of devastating self-awareness and of expressing delicate and personal emotion. And equally adept at penning party anthems and catchy chatter. He hit his lyrical and vocal peak on ‘The Crab Song’, probably the most personal and romantic song in the Faith No More oeuvre. It is the perfect embodiment of how Chuck’s bratty rap could perfectly complement Faith No More’s music. Lyrically, he evokes every emotion in a doomed relationship arc: love, yearning, frustration, anger, hatred, regret. Or, as Chuck has himself said: ‘Getting broken up with, thus turning from a sad little love monkey into a raging psychopathic, blood-lusting, sociopath of a serial killer, inflicting the pain in your heart upon everyone who has the misfortune of crossing your path….theoretically speaking…per se…a real bloodbath…..then turning back into a sad little love chimp oh so regretful of what you’ve done.’

Now I know why everything turns grey, but it’s our own world we paint
And I want the brightest, I want flourescence every day and night

 

Deepest sympathy to the band and all who were close to Chuck. A special word for his dear friend Douglas Esper, who went beyond the call of duty to ensure that Chuck got the recognition he so richly deserved in recent years.

Heartfelt sympathy to Chuck’s long-term partner Pip Logan, his two daughters, Erica and Sophie, and to his grandson Wolfgang Logan Mosley.

 

 

 

607, 2017

My Faith No More biography set for 2018 release

July 6th, 2017|20 Comments

So, finally, some news on the book

 

Jawbone Press, the leading UK music book publishers, will release Small Victories, the new definitive biography of Faith No More written by former BBC and Guardian journalist Adrian Harte, in autumn 2018.

Based on meticulous research and hundreds of extensive new interviews with current and former band members and other key figures, the book will tell the story of one of the most significant bands of the late 20th century, and show how Faith No More helped redefine rock, metal and alternative music.

Author Adrian Harte, editor of the popular Faith No More 2.0 website and media intelligence manager at European football organisation UEFA, said. “I’m extremely grateful to Jawbone Press for giving me this opportunity to tell the true story of Faith No More. I hope that the book – written with the diligence of a journalist but the passion of a fan – will do justice to this captivating band and give Faith No More the book it deserves.”

The book will be published by Jawbone Press in autumn 2018. Jawbone Press has a rich history of publishing books with interesting angles and untold stories.

For book updates between now and publication follow @faithnomore20 and faithnomorebook.com

 

1805, 2017

Faith No More pay tribute to late, great Chris Cornell

May 18th, 2017|1 Comment


The music world is still stunned with shock and sadness at the passing of Soundgarden and Audioslave and all-round rock god and rock legend Chris Cornell.

Faith No More and Soundgarden followed parallel and often criss-crossing paths from the Seattle band’s earliest shows – sometimes literally sharing a stage – right up until 2014 in Hyde Park.

Therefore it was no great surprise that FNM paid heartfelt tribute to Chris today:

“Chris Cornell was a Great Singer and Songwriter, and an old, dear Friend of Everyone in This Band.

His sudden passing is beyond comprehension right now.

Our heartfelt condolences and best wishes to His Children, Loved Ones, and Musical Partners.

May He R.I.P.”

Mike Patton also paid tribute:

“Very sad news about Chris Cornell. Did a lot of roadwork with him and Soundgarden. He was a very nice guy. My sympathies to his family, the Soundgarden family and his friends. May he rest in peace.”

The connection between the bands was so strong that Chris was even considered as a potential vocalist for Faith No More after they parted company with Chuck Mosley. Greg Prato explained in Classic Rock:

“Eventually, the search for a singer began and Soundgarden’s Chris Cornell’s name came up.

“Soundgarden opened up for us a few times in Seattle,” remembers Gould. “We were friends with them. I think one day, Mike and I went to Chris’s house to jam, but I don’t think that we had a musical connection.”

And Soundgarden took the chance to show their appreciation to FNM in Prato’s Faith No More and Mr Bungle Companion:

“This was weird”- our first gigs with Faith No More, we opened for them, our next gigs with Faith No More they opened for us, and then our next gigs with Faith No More, we’re opening for them again. That was before ‘Superunknown’ blew up [in 1994], so it might have turned all around again! We’ve toured with Faith No More probably more than anybody.” – Kim Thayil

“That’s when Faith No More was at their full mighty power, and they were just incredible. Oh my God. They were just one of the most stunning bands I’ve ever seen in my life.” – Matt Cameron

 

2903, 2017

INTERVIEW: Bill Gould speaks to Balkan Rock

March 29th, 2017|Tags: , |12 Comments

Faith No More’s Bill Gould has spoken to Serbian music website Balkan Rock, with a lengthy interview published yesterday.

Here are some choice cuts:

On Sol Invictus:

“[Sol Invictus] was definitely a lot of work, like all our albums usually are, but I could say that this album was certainly the biggest challenge in the sense that we were all by ourselves, almost as in a vacuum…I always thought that the band had much more to say, so I’m very happy that it came to this.

On the band:

I also realized that as long as the band exists, I will have to accept that some things will never change.

The positive side is that everyone has the opportunity to contribute, so that the result is usually better than would have been the case that it comes from one individual or doubles. In addition, I think it creates an atmosphere of teamwork that is transferred to our performances. On the other hand, things become very inefficient when decisions are made.

Oh, and Billy also mentioned some of the bands he likes listening to: Usssy, Burial, BadBadNotGood, Getatchew Mekurya, Bucolica, Protomartyr.

 

 

703, 2017

Roddy Bottum to star alongside Michael Cera in new Sebastian Silva film

March 7th, 2017|Tags: , |13 Comments

Faith No More founder member and keyboard player Roddy Bottum will step in front of the camera in the new movie from star Chilean director Sebastian Silva.

Roddy shared some on-location photos from filming in the Catskills on Instagram last week, and he has revealed more details on the project to us at Faith No More 2.0.

Roddy said: “I just finished two weeks shooting a film called Tyrel by director Sebastian Silva. He’s a good friend of mine and asked me to be in his new movie. It is sort of an ensemble piece about a group of guys that go on a birthday weekend trip up to the Catskills in a cabin. Michael Cera, Caleb Landry Jones [Get Out], Jason Mitchell [Straight Outta Compton] and Chris Abbott also star.”

Silva is the rising star of South American cinema with a trio of breakout highly-lauded English-language movies in Crystal Fairy (the 2013 film that inspired the band name of the latest Ipecac super group), Magic Magic (both also staring Cera) and Nasty Baby.

Roddy is no stranger to the world of film either. An avid filmmaker in his teens, Roddy initially moved to San Francisco in 1981 to study film at San Francisco State University. Roddy has scored Adam & Steve (2005), What Goes Up (2009), Kabluey (2007), scored Gigantic [2008], Fred the Movie (2010) and the documentary Hit So Hard [2010].

Roddy added: “I think it’s gonna be a really special movie. He’s kind of my favorite filmmaker.”

Nico’s porch swing

A post shared by Roddy Bottum (@roddybottum) on

it’s so cold with Caleb

A post shared by Roddy Bottum (@roddybottum) on

guys. the director is so mean.

A post shared by Roddy Bottum (@roddybottum) on

1402, 2017

TOP 10: Faith No More’s most romantic songs

February 14th, 2017|Tags: , , , , , |3 Comments

Faith No More don’t do romance. They don’t do love songs. They don’t do personal.

Certainly in the Mike Patton era, the lyrics to Faith No More songs have largely eschewed the personal – and indeed the biographical. Both the music and the lyrics are instead created as scenes rather than personal sketches or deep revelations into the soul. Mike Patton told Rock Hard in 2015:

“I like creating fictional characters and trying to appropriate their psychology…They are little films. To be totally frank, I do not know exactly myself what some of my lyrics say because I try before anything else to follow the music. When I discover a new song, I imagine the sounds and the notes on top. Only then do I try to find the words which come the closest as possible to what I have heard in my head.”

So finding traditional love songs in the Faith No More oeuvre is not a straightforward task. Nonetheless, with the help of some covers, here’s a top 10 for Valentine’s Day.

10 Spanish Eyes

A cover provoked by Bill Gould’s spell of listening to San Francisco oldie easy-listening station Magic 61, Spanish Eyes was originally recorded by Al Martino in 1965 and is a reworking of a song called Moon Over Naples released the same year. The FNM version was released as the B-side of Ricochet on most UK and European releases in May 1995. The song was recorded, like all King for a Day B-sides at Bill Gould’s studio – and is one of the only Faith No More recordings to feature Dean Menta on guitar. It has never been played live.
(More here from FNM Followers / photo by Patton Mad)

 

9 This Guy’s in Love with You

“Who doesn’t love some Burt Bacharach?” asked Mike Patton as he introduced this cover on the band’s 2015 BBC Radio 1 session. Patton adores the classic composer – “If you don’t like his stuff, you don’t know shit” he told Kerrang in 1997 – while Roddy Bottum added at the same BBC session: “Its a song with a real twist. He’s such a crafty songwriter. We’ve always loved this song and this is the first time we’ve ever recorded the song.”

For a song which became such a staple of their live show, Faith No More did not play This Guy until right near the end of the 1.0 era – on 16 September 1997 at the 9:30 Club in Washington, DC.

 

8 The Crab Song

Chuck Mosley‘s lyrics tended to the autobiographical much more than Mike Patton’s. Certainly, Faith No More, while often hitting the depths of misanthropy, have rarely sounded so out and out melancholic as on this track. Written by Chuck (lyrics) and Bill and Mike Bordin (music), the track was released on Introduce Yourself in 1987 and has remained a live favourite ever since. It is emblematic of IY era Faith No More: Chuck ad-libs, moody synth wash, plangent bass, dramatic segue into all-out thrash. And the perfect Valentine’s Day lyrics:

“Hurts, hurts, hurts like a like a motherfucker
Love, it hurts, it kills, like a sonofabitch”

Here’s a very early live version  – from 1985

7 Glory Box

Our final cover. Faith No More, like the rest of the world, couldn’t resist trip-hop in the mid-1990s and offered up this perfect cover of the sublime Glory Box from Portishead’s Dummy. FNM even went full-on Bristol on their 1997 release Album of the Year with Stripsearch the perfect trip-rock song (Bill Gould Keybord magazine 1997: “The loop in the beginning made such a difference. Before we put it in, the song sounded more like Queensryche. But after the loop, it sounded more like Portishead or something. It gave it a darker, different slant. It didn’t sound like a rock band anymore.”). Anyway, here’s the iconic version of Glory Box with Patton bathing in all of Santiago’s spittle at the Monsters of Rock Chile in 1995, the last of the 13 times they would play the song live.

6 Pristina

Seemingly a reference to the Kosovan capital, the final song on Faith No More final pre-split album was a fitting farewell and another stunning evocation of mood. That came mostly in the music but the lyrics also suggest a parting of lovers:

In every flower bed
In every marriage bed

I’ll be with you
I’m watching you

5 Be Aggressive

Probably more of a sex song than a love song per se, the lyrics for this famously homoerotic Angel Dust track were penned by Roddy Bottum before he came out as gay in 1993. I’ll include it as a love song purely for this line which at least suggests temporary infatuation:
“You’re my flavor of the week”

4 Underwater Love

A metal-based Onion-style satire site once claimed that a woman in Wisconsin had tried to get this song banned due to it apparently encouraging children to become mermaids. The song, of course, makes no such allusions but does contain just enough darkness beneath its oh so shiny surface to make such stories credible. In a rare early explanation of his lyrics or perhaps a bluff, Patton told Kerrang! in 1990: “Underwater Love was basically about murdering someone you love.”
But in the spirit of the day that’s in it, we’ll imagine that these lyrics have a more romantic meaning:

It’s wonderful how the surface ripples
But you’re perfect and I cannot breathe

Forever longing to make you mine
But I can’t escape your stare

Hold me closer, keep me near
My underwater love

Hold me closer, keep me near
I’ll never get enough

Here’s a a 1988 demo version – with significantly different lyrics

The band have not played the song live since November 1992.

3 I Won’t Forget You

The lyrics initially read like the sweet and sentimental ballad of a loser in love. Mike Patton’s brutal and pained delivery suggest something more menacing, with the metaphorical hell of abandonment the most innocent explanation.

You never love someone
Only what they leave behind
And I won’t forget you

I Won’t Forget You is a Patton/Gould composition recorded during the King For A Day… Fool For A Lifetime sessions. It appeared on Who Cares a Lot, the awfully titled compilation from 1998, and it has never been played live.

2 From Out of Nowhere

Probably Faith No More’s finest pop moment. Track one from The Real Thing is a song that could and should have propelled them to mainstream success months before Epic finally did. Keyboard-led, hooky, catchy, those Patton vocals and eventually some Jim Martin crunching adornment, it is The Real Thing in three minutes, 21 seconds.

Obsession rules me
I’m yours from the start
I know you see me
Our eyes interlock

Jim and Faith No More Followers have everything you ever need to know about the song here so I’ll not add much more , only to extract these quotes from Roddy Bottum and Mike Patton on the song’s meaning.

Roddy: “It seems to be about a chance meeting, and how chance plays a role in interaction”,

Patton: “Jello shots, hermetic philosophy, Ptolemaic cosmology… you know, your average commie/junkie jibber-jabber.”

Here’s the band “performing” the song on UK TV institution Top of the Pops in 1990.

1 She Loves Me Not

Regarded by reviewers as either cheesy or soulful when it came out in 1997 on Album of the Year, the straightforward romantic soul of She Loves Me Not was initially met with ambivalence by the band themselves.
The track was written by Bill Gould, Mike Patton and Mike Bordin, and Bill gave their take on the song to Keyboard magazine in 1997:

“This song almost didn’t make it on the record. We almost didn’t even record vocals for it because it’s so different from all of the other songs. I wrote this song, and I was almost embarrassed to play it for anybody in the band because it’s so soft – but at the same time it’s a good song. It’s like a Boyz II Men song of something. I didn’t play it for anybody for, like, a half a year, and then finally I played it for Puffy. He thought we should give it a try, so I gave it to Patton, and he said, ‘I wrote words, but they’re pretty over-the-top.’ But we went forward with it, and he really sang his ass off.”

Some of those over-the-top words:

I’m here, alone
On the the telephone line

I’m right where you want me to be
And I’ll wait alone and never ask why
Ill be where you want me to be

Song Poll

What is your favourite track from Sol Invictus?
Here’s our playlist of possibly the best version of each:

Switch to mobile version