Chuck Mosley passed away on 9 November 2017 at the age of just 57.
Chuck was the voice of Faith No More for most of the 1980s, and on their first two albums, and in many ways the personification of the the raw, untamed and brash band spirit of that era.
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The band summed up their loss and his contribution with a poignant tribute last year:

It’s with a heavy, heavy heart we acknowledge the passing of our friend and bandmate, Chuck Mosley. He was a reckless and caterwauling force of energy who delivered with conviction and helped set us on a track of uniqueness and originality that would not have developed the way it had had he not been a part. How fortunate we are to have been able to perform with him last year in a reunion style when we re-released our very first record. His enthusiasm, his sense of humor, his style and his bravado will be missed by so many. We were a family, an odd and dysfunctional family, and we’ll be forever grateful for the time we shared with Chuck.

In writing the Faith No More biography, Small Victories: The True Story of Faith No More, I was keen to make sure Chuck’s contribution was placed in its correct context.
Here are some extra quotes not used in the final version of the book that further help in this regard.

Paul Wims [who played with Chuck and Bill Gould in The Animated]:
“Chuck Mosely was classically trained. He was an excellent keyboard and piano player. Chuck composed classical pieces when he as around ten years old. Chuck was also a very good song writer and wrote songs with intricate chord changes.”

Matt Wallace:
“I believe he was really, really talented. I think without Chuck, we wouldn’t have had a Faith No More. I think he established the essential boiler plate. Chuck had a genuine attitude. He had the attitude coming from a place of a feeling of lacking: like he couldn’t really step up to the plate. He was really propelled by this sense of “I’m not good enough to do this.””

Roddy Bottum:
“He was really close to me on tour, we had a sense of humour together. We found the same things funny. That’s a hard thing to lose. Laughing through it was always helpful.”

Bill Gould:
“There’s an authenticity about Chuck. He wasn’t faking his dysfunction. He had this kind of cigarette grit to him that you can’t fake. And when he was on, he was on … I mean, we did a lot of shows with him, and half the shows we did, especially in places that didn’t matter, he was a great front person.”

Rock in peace. Rest in power.

(This perfect tribute video was put together by Jim and Faith No More Followers last year)