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2811, 2018

Roddy sheds light on Faith No More future in new interview

November 28th, 2018|Faith No More, Interviews, News|5 Comments

The Ring, the Cage, and the Stages Chandler Sorrells interviewed Roddy Bottum this week, and asked him about the sessions that Roddy, Mike Bordin and Bill Gould had worked together on in San Francisco in late 2017, as reported in Small Victories: The True Story of Faith No More.

Roddy said: “The last record was a real struggle to make,  it felt really good and it was a really great exercise, taking us, in our inner family sort of like creative process to the next level. It was a place that we kind of needed to go to make Sol Invictus. We spent a lot of time sort of coming back together and getting to know each other again and making music again and playing old songs, and then it kind of reached a point where it felt kind of dirty to just do what we were doing, just these shows of old song. So we took it to the next level and that felt really good I think we all walked away from that – even though it was like a really hard process to get
through that record – I think we walked away from it with really positive and optimistic sort of perspectives.
“I will periodically go to San Francisco and make music with those guys and do what we do. It’s a really special unique thing that we kind of share especially like me and Mike Bordin and Billy… We were super young we were like you know 18 or 19 years old when we started making music, so we kind of get in the room and we have a language that speaks really loud and really clear at least as the three of us. I mean where it goes is questionable but we have sort of a
language that’s kind of undeniable a really sort of family sense.
“I think we all acknowledge that it’s not something that any of us want to turn our backs on, and it’s kind of fun to do. So in the hopes of pushing things forward and making new music, we continue to do that, to get together and make new sounds and just have a dialogue about prospects and songs and where we go in the future.”

Asked “So what you’re saying is since the last tour ended you have pretty much been jamming and toying around with stuff that y’all don’t know for sure yet what might come from it, am I correct?”, Roddy replied:
“Yeah, that’s fair to say, yeah absolutely.”

Listen to the full interview:

In other news, Roddy’s major film acting debut Tyrel is released in the US on Monday.

 

1911, 2018

Swiss station Couleur3 broadcasts Faith No More special

November 19th, 2018|Faith No More, News|2 Comments

Leading Swiss-French public radio station Couleur3‘s flagship heavy metal show Rhinoféroce dedicated a whole episode this week to Faith No More and Small Victories.

I was interviewed at length about the band and the book, and a dozen FNM and FNM-related tracks were played in the hour-long programme.
You can listen here below:

Or on podcast here.

1611, 2018

London fans enjoy Small Victories night

November 16th, 2018|Faith No More, News|3 Comments

On Wednesday night, the Rock N Roll Book Club hosted a Small Victories and Faith No More night at the cosy and charming and historic Dublin Castle venue in Camden, London.

Around 50 Faith No More fans turned up for an evening of music and books. First up, Rock N Roll Book Club’s Julie Hamill interviewed Adrian Harte, author of Small Victories: The True Story of Faith No More about the book and the band. Julie, herself an esteemed author and an experienced host and presenter, expertly orchestrated the deep dive into the book. The interview was a mixture of short readings, probing questions and humorous insights, culminating in a series of questions from the audience.

Small Victories and Faith No More Q and A with the Rock N’Roll Book Club

The Rock N’ Roll Book Club’s Julie Hamill interviews Adrian Harte, author of Small Victories: The True Story of Faith No More live at the Dublin Castle.

Posted by Faith No More 2.0 on Wednesday, 14 November 2018

The discussion and subsequent book signing by the author was followed by what can only be described as a rip-roaring set by the ultimate Faith No More tribute act, Faith No Man. Opening their set with a Faith No More-ified version of “Paperback Writer”, the band got the crowd onto their feet and rocking with a hits-laden set that was eerily reminiscent of Faith No More themselves. Indeed, if you closed your eyes, one could almost imagine that they were The Real Thing.

Faith No Man at Small Victories book event

The brilliant Faith No Man play the Dublin Castle in Camden as part of the Rock N Roll Book Club’s Small Victories book signing event.

Posted by Faith No More 2.0 on Wednesday, 14 November 2018

Thanks to a wonderful concept, the best possible venue, an enthusiastic audience, a brilliant band, an accomplished host, tuned-in staff, and a grateful author, the night was a huge success.

I would like to thank to Julie (and Tony) from the Rock N Roll Book Club, Bugbear, Dublin Castle, Troy, the two Matts, Steve and all of Faith No Man (go see this band!), Tom from Jawbone Press, Darrell, Nessie, Allen, Matt, Jimmy and everyone who attended.

911, 2018

Small Victories and Faith No More interview with Rock N’ Roll Archaeology podcast

November 9th, 2018|Faith No More, News|1 Comment

I had the great pleasure to speak at length with Christian Swain for his Rock N’ Roll Archaeology Deeper Digs in Rock series, which is now available for listening on your preferred podcast platform.

Or listen below

Spotify

Apple

2018-11-09 13_18_13-Deeper Digs in Rock_ Faith No More with Adrian Harte — Rock N Roll Archaeologypo

911, 2018

Chuck Mosley tribute one year on from his tragic death

November 9th, 2018|Faith No More, News|1 Comment

Chuck Mosley passed away on 9 November 2017 at the age of just 57.
Chuck was the voice of Faith No More for most of the 1980s, and on their first two albums, and in many ways the personification of the the raw, untamed and brash band spirit of that era.
Embed from Getty Images

The band summed up their loss and his contribution with a poignant tribute last year:

It’s with a heavy, heavy heart we acknowledge the passing of our friend and bandmate, Chuck Mosley. He was a reckless and caterwauling force of energy who delivered with conviction and helped set us on a track of uniqueness and originality that would not have developed the way it had had he not been a part. How fortunate we are to have been able to perform with him last year in a reunion style when we re-released our very first record. His enthusiasm, his sense of humor, his style and his bravado will be missed by so many. We were a family, an odd and dysfunctional family, and we’ll be forever grateful for the time we shared with Chuck.

In writing the Faith No More biography, Small Victories: The True Story of Faith No More, I was keen to make sure Chuck’s contribution was placed in its correct context.
Here are some extra quotes not used in the final version of the book that further help in this regard.

Paul Wims [who played with Chuck and Bill Gould in The Animated]:
“Chuck Mosely was classically trained. He was an excellent keyboard and piano player. Chuck composed classical pieces when he as around ten years old. Chuck was also a very good song writer and wrote songs with intricate chord changes.”

Matt Wallace:
“I believe he was really, really talented. I think without Chuck, we wouldn’t have had a Faith No More. I think he established the essential boiler plate. Chuck had a genuine attitude. He had the attitude coming from a place of a feeling of lacking: like he couldn’t really step up to the plate. He was really propelled by this sense of “I’m not good enough to do this.””

Roddy Bottum:
“He was really close to me on tour, we had a sense of humour together. We found the same things funny. That’s a hard thing to lose. Laughing through it was always helpful.”

Bill Gould:
“There’s an authenticity about Chuck. He wasn’t faking his dysfunction. He had this kind of cigarette grit to him that you can’t fake. And when he was on, he was on … I mean, we did a lot of shows with him, and half the shows we did, especially in places that didn’t matter, he was a great front person.”

Rock in peace. Rest in power.

(This perfect tribute video was put together by Jim and Faith No More Followers last year)

1810, 2018

Ghost show off their Faith No More love

October 18th, 2018|Faith No More, News, Other bands|0 Comments

The lead singer and main man of Ghost, Tobias Forge aka Cardinal Copia aka Papa Emeritus has been spotted wearing a Faith No More logo t-shirt.

The shot appeared on Instagram and Twitter yesterday just as Forge won a Swedish court case brought by former band members, and seems to have been taken during the shoot for the Danse Macabre video which was also released this week.

Tobias/Cardinal/Papa has previously kept his Faith No More admiration close to his chest. However, in an interview with The Quietus in 2013 in which he gave a track-by-track commentary on the band’s covers EP If You Have Ghost, recorded and produced by Dave Grohl, he said of opening track, Abba cover ‘I’m A Marionette’:

“Let’s face it, ABBA are an important part of pop culture everywhere, and in Sweden they completely overshadow everyone else. I grew up liking them for sure, but we didn’t choose to cover this song because it was written and recorded by Abba, we just wanted to do this particular track – it works well with the concept of Ghost.

“Plus, we felt we could rebuild it in a more percussive way – you could say we put a Faith No More angle on the track, and because of this approach, it made sense for Dave to lay down the drums. Obviously, we wanted him to be able to shine – it made more sense for him to play on a track like this than, say, an AC/DC song with a much straighter rhythm.”

Here’s that track:

 

 

 

2009, 2018

Latest book reviews

September 20th, 2018|Faith No More, News|3 Comments

Here’s a round-up of the latest book reviews for Small Victories

Reviews of Small Victories

Classic Rock magazine

“Harte’s eye for detail coupled with bullseye analysis and a breezy prose style illuminates the band’s dramatic and chaotic trajectory with authoritative calm…Moreish quotes and anecdotes further sugar the ride, and ultimately steer the book into the category marked “Essential”.” ClassicRock

Planet Rock magazine (UK)

“Genuinely insightful, Harte’s focus on the quintet’s punk attitude and thrillingly eclectic, forward-thinking music does a great service to both.” PlanetRock_redacted

Record Collector

“Harte’s work probes every cranny and crevice with the zeal of a hungry aye-aye looking for grubs…Small Victories delivers the goods on musical insights and in-fights.” “A fascinating insight into one of the greatest bands ever to capture – and perhaps fracture – the public imagination.” 082018_bb-aye-aye-lemur_feat

Spectrum Culture

“Harte’s prose manages to describe the music as well as the delicate and challenging writing process that brought five very different egos together to create the quintessential Faith No More sound. Despite the band’s penchant for pissing off audiences (and each other), Harte recounts just how driven the band were for success and how that drive often conflicted with their need to be artistically true to themselves. Where a band like the Replacements acted out to satisfy some deep-seated need to sabotage themselves, Harte asserts Faith No More acted out to stave off boredom.”
“Small Victories is a joy to read. Faith No More has an impossibly complex history and a habit of deliberately obfuscating the truth, and Harte has managed to streamline all of it into a cohesive and compelling narrative.”

Under the Radar

“Harte’s narrative is so engaging, one does not want the band’s tale to end. For the Faith No More enthusiast, there is much to dig into here. But perhaps more tellingly and to the book’s great credit, even the Faith No More newbie will be entranced and enrapt by the tale.”

The Wire

“Adrian Harte’s extraordinarily dense biography presents a strong case for the band’s multfacetedness…A notoriously volatile group of individuals, each member is portrayed as both flawed and virtuous; in other words, human. This tells a story their well documented public snipes at one another cannot. There’s some acute analysis from Harte regarding Mike Patton.” TheWire

The Irish Times

“Harte, who runs an entertaining and valued blog on the band, has delivered a solid, well-researched and affectionate portrait.”

Wee Review

“A meticulously researched and highly readable work…Small Victories will surely prove to be the definitive book on a band who were long overdue the biographical treatment.”

Sound Renaissance

“Harte, the curator behind Faith No More 2.0, infuses a collection of interviews with band members, managers, and key figures. These first-hand testimonies are cunningly interwoven with an empirical narrative that serves as an encyclopedia for every triumph and struggle the band has faced.”

Rock N’ Roll Fables

“Small Victories answers all of your burning questions along with insight even the most faithful FNM devotee may not know. Where did Mike Bordin get the nickname “Puffy”? How does Cliff Burton fit into all of this madness? Was Courtney Love actually a one-time FNM vocalist? Did the band really reach out to Chris Cornell when Chuck Mosley was ousted? “The most comprehensive Faith No More book you’ll ever get your hands on, hands down, and a must own for fans of the band or of the evolution of rock music.”
1506, 2018

Links for a day 205: World Cup. Dead Cross, book and mash-up

June 15th, 2018|Faith No More, Links for a day, News|7 Comments

World Cup of Faith No More

In the greatest crossover event of all time, the Faith No More World Cup has kicked off on Twitter. Thirty-two Faith No More songs divided into 8 groups of 4. Twitter users vote for the favourite and the two with the most votes in each group advance to the round of 16. Then it is one song against another all the way until the final.
See all the polls here and vote

 

Book interviews

Interest is picking up on my Faith No More book, Small Victories—published by Jawbone Press in September—and two sites have published interviews with me this week.
Here is my chat with Hungarian site Fülesbagoly 

And my interview—including a small excerpt that did not make the final edit—with Czech cultural site Protisedi

Dead Cross on tour

Mike Patton and Dead Cross are earning rave reviews for their high-octane European tour shows. I get the chance to see Dead Cross in Lausanne next week but here are some links showing their recent shows:
Great close-up of video of Dead Cross’s last-minute show in Camden

Friend of the site Nessie captured some great shots here on our Freaks and Geeks page

Jim and Faith No More Followers were at Dead Cross at Download last weekend, and here is their comprehensive review of the two shows.

Is When Good Dogs Do Bad Things the best Patton vocal?

Revolver magazine ran a fan poll to find the best Mike Patton vocal performance, and the Dillinger Escape Plan track was the winner.

Faith No More v Muse v Oasis

I stumbled across another of those Epic-featuring mash-ups recently, and actually the Oasis meets Epic part is somehow alluring.

More book stuff

Here is my guide on where to buy the book if you’re not keen on Amazon.

2802, 2018

New Bill Gould interview in Kerrang!

February 28th, 2018|Faith No More, Interviews, News|4 Comments

The latest issue of Kerrang! features an in-depth interview with Bill Gould on Faith No More’s history and a little bit about the band’s future.

He says:

‘We talk all the time. Are we still a band? I can’t tell you. Last time around, we didn’t even tell our wives that we were making music again, so I’m fucked if I’m going to tell you!’

Bill also gives some nice details on the band’s past – something that of course will be covered in Small Victories, the Faith No More biography which will be published in September.

 

1111, 2017

Chuck Mosley RIP

November 11th, 2017|Faith No More, News|10 Comments

The tragic death of Chuck Mosley has left all Faith No More fans devastated, numb and bereft. Chuck was the voice of Faith No More for most of the 1980s, and in many ways the personification of the the raw, untamed and brash band spirit.

Embed from Getty Images

I did not know Chuck. Unlike many fans, I did not get the chance to meet him in person. But I spoke to him by phone and email. And in recent research I got to appreciate profoundly his role in the band’s creation and evolution and early success. I attempted to capture this contribution and legacy and this spirit and essence over many pages and many months. But today, despite darkness and despair, the band, his band, succeeded in capturing that essence in pitch perfect fashion in a few hours, in a few lines:

It’s with a heavy, heavy heart we acknowledge the passing of our friend and bandmate, Chuck Mosley. He was a reckless and caterwauling force of energy who delivered with conviction and helped set us on a track of uniqueness and originality that would not have developed the way it had had he not been a part. How fortunate we are to have been able to perform with him last year in a reunion style when we re-released our very first record. His enthusiasm, his sense of humor, his style and his bravado will be missed by so many. We were a family, an odd and dysfunctional family, and we’ll be forever grateful for the time we shared with Chuck.

Chuck – charismatic, boisterous, quick-witted – was a natural front man. He joined Faith No More in 1983. The band wanted a presence for live shows rather than a voice for recordings. And Chuck delivered: he was part poet, part punk preacher, part precarious performer, all attitude.

His devil-may-care demeanour was a little deceptive. He said of his introduction to Faith No More: ‘I was really nervous. And I remember being in awe of this sound because I hadn’t heard anything like it before. It made me nervous because I didn’t know what to do with it. You know what I mean? That was where the rapping came from.’ That’s the origin of rap-rock. Punk attitude, unfamiliar music, improvisation — allied to having little chance to rehearse with the rest of the band based down the coast in San Francisco — led to chanting and ranting and, eventually, when things calmed down somewhat in the studio, to rapping: ‘I was just like screaming to the beat, like ranting. Not rapping, but ranting.’

Chuck was also an accomplished lyricist, capable of devastating self-awareness and of expressing delicate and personal emotion. And equally adept at penning party anthems and catchy chatter. He hit his lyrical and vocal peak on ‘The Crab Song’, probably the most personal and romantic song in the Faith No More oeuvre. It is the perfect embodiment of how Chuck’s bratty rap could perfectly complement Faith No More’s music. Lyrically, he evokes every emotion in a doomed relationship arc: love, yearning, frustration, anger, hatred, regret. Or, as Chuck has himself said: ‘Getting broken up with, thus turning from a sad little love monkey into a raging psychopathic, blood-lusting, sociopath of a serial killer, inflicting the pain in your heart upon everyone who has the misfortune of crossing your path….theoretically speaking…per se…a real bloodbath…..then turning back into a sad little love chimp oh so regretful of what you’ve done.’

Now I know why everything turns grey, but it’s our own world we paint
And I want the brightest, I want flourescence every day and night

 

Deepest sympathy to the band and all who were close to Chuck. A special word for his dear friend Douglas Esper, who went beyond the call of duty to ensure that Chuck got the recognition he so richly deserved in recent years.

Heartfelt sympathy to Chuck’s long-term partner Pip Logan, his two daughters, Erica and Sophie, and to his grandson Wolfgang Logan Mosley.

 

 

 

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